2014年1月31日星期五

Kansas Republicans feel a persistent pull toward the right


It looks like the Kansas congressional delegation is moving to the right.




It won’t be easy. Kevin Yoder, Lynn Jenkins, Mike Pompeo and Tim Huelskamp, Republicans all, are already thought to comprise the most conservative delegation in the nation.


But observers from both parties said last week that the potential of tea party primary challenges, coupled with ambition and conviction, may have led the four to conclude it’s impossible to be too conservative in 2014 Kansas.


“That’s exactly what they think,” said Bob Beatty, political science professor at Washburn University in Topeka. “In Kansas, there’s less and less fighting between moderates and conservatives. Now it’s between conservatives and other conservatives.”


That dynamic has been evident for months on the Senate side, where incumbent Sen. Pat Roberts is responding to tea party challenger Milton Wolf with increasingly conservative statements and votes.


But over the last 10 days of January, conservative state Sen. Steve Fitzgerald of Leavenworth said he would challenge Jenkins in the 2nd District Republican primary, in and around Topeka. And former U.S. Rep. Todd Tiahrt, also a fixture on the party’s right, refused to rule out a GOP primary challenge to Pompeo in the 4th District in Wichita.


Fitzgerald said his opposition would be based at least partly on ideology — that Jenkins isn’t conservative enough, at least on some issues.


“She’s had some votes, where she has been compelled by leadership, by (House Speaker John) Boehner … that are not good,” Fitzgerald said.


Tiahrt, whose 2010 Senate campaign staked out solidly conservative territory, said he would make an issue of Pompeo’s effectiveness in Congress if he runs.


“We just want somebody who’s going to fight for us,” he said, mentioning ongoing layoffs in Wichita’s aviation industry.


Jenkins and Pompeo are unlikely to face serious Democratic opposition this year. That means their biggest threats, if they develop, will come from the GOP right.


Both have plenty of campaign cash. Jenkins will still be considered a strong favorite. Yet Pompeo might have more difficulty against Tiahrt, who once held the House seat and is well-known in the Wichita area.


Pompeo firmly rejected any claim that he’s vulnerable to a tea party primary challenge, from Tiahrt or anyone else.


“I’m pretty focused on … the people of the 4th District,” he said. “I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about things outside of that box.”


Jenkins campaign spokesman Bill Roe also brushed aside any tea party critique of the incumbent.


Jenkins “boasts one of the more conservative records in Congress, consistent with the values of eastern Kansans,” he said in a prepared statement.


Kansas remains a conservative state. A Gallup poll, released last week, showed Kansas voters are more Republican than all but four other states: Idaho, Utah, North Dakota and Wyoming.


And the voting records of all four Kansans in the House show a consistently conservative tilt. In 2012, a study by The Kansas City Star showed the Kansas delegation cast the most conservative votes of any state delegation in the country.


But Democrats — and some Republicans — said fears of tea party politics may now be pushing the votes of Kansas House members even more to the right.


On Wednesday, for example, the House considered a final version of the farm bill, a $956 billion, 10-year package of agriculture subsidies and nutrition programs.


Reliably conservative, safe-seat Republicans — including Sam Graves and Vicky Hartzler of Missouri, Ted Poe of Texas, Darrell Issa of California — lined up to approve the measure. The GOP leadership in the House recommended approval, as did the American Farm Bureau Federation and other farm lobbying groups.


Yet two groups with strong tea party sympathies, the Club for Growth and Heritage Action, denounced the bill. They said they would “score” a vote for the measure as anti-conservative. Conservative bloggers also criticized the measure as bloated, pointing out that it would spend more than $750 billion over 10 years on food stamps.


All four Kansas House members voted no — on what is arguably the single most important piece of federal legislation in Kansas.


Pompeo said it would be “ludicrous” to suggest he cast that vote because of pressure from the right. And in a prepared statement, Jenkins said she opposed the bill because it “costs too much and fails to achieve any significant regulatory reform.”


Huelskamp also said the bill was too expensive. Yoder agreed, and pointed to the opposition of Kansas cattle producers to the final product.


But Democrats claimed the four GOP members opposed the bill because they feared later criticism for supporting any government spending, even farm subsidies that are critical in Kansas. Roberts, who is facing an actual tea party challenger, has said he’ll vote against the farm bill.


“You can’t be tea party enough,” said Kansas Democratic Party chairwoman Joan Wagnon. “It doesn’t make for good government.”


Some Republicans pushed back, pointing to measures other than the farm bill. Jenkins and Yoder voted in favor of the recent $1.1 trillion catch-all spending bill, in part because it contained more than $400 million to build a biology research lab in Manhattan.


Pompeo and Huelskamp voted against that measure.


Indeed, not all the pressure facing at least one Kansas incumbent comes from the tea party right. Huelskamp is likely to face at least one GOP primary opponent who considers himself more to the center on most issues.


And some said the farm bill vote, and others like it, may not be directly related to possible tea party challenges this year. Instead, they said, the delegation may be worried about elections later this decade.


And at some point, they said, statewide offices will open up — the Kansas governorship, for example, or a U.S. Senate seat. All four House members may want to pursue those opportunities, pitting them against each other on the primary ballot.


Votes for federal spending, particularly for programs like food stamps, are typically unpopular in GOP primaries.


“They’re playing to the primary electorate,” said Burdett Loomis, a political science professor at the University of Kansas. “They’re thinking about the day they may run against each other.”


Yoder said that theory may give politicians too much credit for advance planning.


“It’s a nice, general parlor game to suggest these grand designs,” he said. “But in reality, politics is a lot more chaotic than we ever want it to be.”


But some longtime Republicans say the ongoing rightward drift of their party, and the splits that has caused, may eventually hurt the GOP brand in Kansas.


“We’ve always been accused of eating our own,” said outgoing Kansas Insurance Commissioner Sandy Praeger, a Republican who is now aiding some Democratic candidates.


“Now they’re not satisfied with eating up moderates. They have to eat up fellow conservatives, too.


“It’s gotten kind of crazy.”



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SM Northwest takes command late, beats Harmon


High schools


The Star


Updated: 2014-02-01T04:17:53Z



By CHARLES REDFIELD


Special to The Star


The Shawnee Mission Northwest Cougars were best down the stretch in their game against the Harmon Hawks on Friday night.



Read more High schools


The Cougars scored the last six points and took a 69-65 victory in a non-league game at Harmon.


The Hawks took a 65-63 on two free throws by senior Sheldon Carson with 2 minutes, 13 seconds left in the game, but Harmon did not score again.


SM Northwest senior Jake Horner hit one of two free throws with 1:51 to play, and the Cougars got the rebound on his miss. Brady Skeens was fouled 20 seconds later and also made one of two free throws, tying the game at 65-65. And, again, the Cougars got the rebound.


Senior Andrew Medis got open under the basket for an easy basket that gave the Cougars a 67-65 lead.


The Hawks called timeout and worked the ball with 6-6 sophomore Isiah Richardson trying a three-pointer from the left wing that missed.


Skeens got the rebound and found senior Jake Horner on the break for a layup with 10 seconds left that closed the scoring.


“Defensively, we didn’t play very well,” Cougars coach Mike Rose said. “We were able to get some offensive rebounds late that really helped.”


The Hawks were hurt when junior Jajuan Coleman fouled out with 2:37 left in the game. He was the leading scorer for Harmon with 21 points. Richardson added 17.


“There are no such thing as moral victories, but that’s the best we have played all year,” Harmon coach David Gonzales said.


SM Northwest dominated early, leading 18-12 at the end of the first quarter, but the Hawks cut the margin to 34-31 at halftime.


The game was tied 50-50 entering the fourth quarter.


Harmon had a four-point lead after Coleman made two free throws with 4:54 left, but it couldn’t get the advantage to six.


Skeens, a 6-6 senior who has committed to Washburn, led the Cougars with 29 points. He had 14 in the first half and added 11 in the third quarter.


Senior Warren Specht added 13 points and senior Andrew Medis 10.


“This game will good for us in the future,” Rose said. “We survived and got a win.”










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Fatal accident on I-35 south of Olathe


Breaking News


Updated: 2014-02-01T03:29:53Z






One person was killed in an accident on northbound Interstate 35 between Gardner and Olathe.



Read more Breaking News


The Kansas Highway Patrol said the accident occurred about 8:30 p.m. Friday near the weigh station.


No other details were immediately available.




| Matt Campbell, mcampbell@kcstar.com









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Kansas offense is clicking in conference play


— The ball would move, and the players would glide through the motions, but Bill Self could always tell that something was missing.



Kansas' Andrew Wiggins goes up for a dunk against Iowa State during Wednesday night's game at Allen Fieldhouse. Wiggins scored a career-high 29 points in the win.



It wasn’t effort level — Kansas’ freshmen were coachable and hard-working. But the problem with young players, as the cliché goes, is that they simply do not know what they don’t know. Sometimes ignorance isn’t a character flaw. It’s just a way of life.


So in the early months of the season, as the KU freshmen tried to find their place, the Jayhawks’ offensive sets often looked robotic and programmed. The players would often be in the right spot, but they’d just forget the most important part of the game.


“We say this all the time, you should run offense to score,” Self said. “Sometimes young kids just run offense because they’re supposed to run offense.”


Sometime in the last month, as the sixth-ranked Jayhawks started 7-0 in the Big 12 Conference, it all started to click. Maybe it was confidence. Maybe it was experience, Maybe a combination of the two.


But as the KU defense has struggled to consistently grind down opposing teams, the Jayhawks have found another formula for success: They’re simply outscoring teams.


In seven conference games, Kansas is averaging a Big 12-best 84.9 points and shooting 54.4 percent from the field. And after shooting just 34.5 percent from three-point range during nonconference play, the Jayhawks are now hitting 41.7 percent from the three-point line in conference play.


“When the ball moves,” Self said, “and it doesn’t stick, and we get rotation, we are getting where we’re fairly hard to guard.”


Kansas continued its recent three-point shooting surge in its victory over Iowa State on Wednesday, hitting 10 of 22 from behind the three-point line. It was the kind of performance that caused Iowa State coach Fred Hoiberg to consider something that would have sounded absurd three weeks ago. If the Jayhawks’ offense continues to score at this rate, they just might be capable of running the table in the 18-game Big 12 season.


“Sure, I think so,” Hoiberg said. “If they’re hitting shots like that, that’s going to be a tough, tough team to beat.”


On Wednesday night, in the moments after Kansas’ 92-81 victory, Self kept getting asked about the growth of freshman Andrew Wiggins, who is now averaging 17.7 points and 7.3 rebounds in Big 12 play. For nearly seven minutes, the questions went on. Finally, a reporter took the time to point out that Perry Ellis had finished with 20 points and nobody had even mentioned him.


“Quiet 20,” Self said, before segueing into a larger point.


“I think we’re getting harder to guard because we’re able to score in all five spots. It’s easier to guard a team when you have to defend three spots, or you have to defend four spots.”


From an efficiency standpoint, the Jayhawks are reaching rare territory. After the Iowa State victory, KU is now averaging 1.21 points per possession for the year, the highest mark of the Self era.


But for all the positive trends on offense, the Jayhawks are still averaging nearly 15 turnovers per game in conference play. Each game, Self says, you can almost count on three or four unforced turnovers — the kind of stuff where the ball just goes flying into the second row. If KU can stop wasting so many possessions, Self says, there is still another step they can take.


“The ball still sticks with us,” Self said. “And if you were going to evaluate our passing, I’d still say it’s below where it needs to be.”



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Woman attacked, robbed while walking home from work in KC


News


Updated: 2014-01-31T18:29:54Z






Kansas City police are looking for a man who robbed and tried to rape a 32-year-old woman who was walking home from work early Friday.



Read more News


The woman was walking in the 2300 block of East 12th Street about 1:30 a.m. when the man approached her from behind, pressed a gun to her temple and said, “Give me your (expletive!)”


The gunman pulled her behind a dry cleaner building, shoved her to the ground and ripped off her clothes as she fought him. As he pulled down his pants, a nearby dog started barking, police said. Startled, the man grabbed the victim’s purse and ran away. The victim ran to her apartment and called police.


A paramedic checked her for injuries and she refused further medical treatment.


Investigators were checking surveillance cameras in the area to see if any recorded the man or attack.


Christine Vendel, cvendel@kcstar.com









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Kansas man gets probation for killing girlfriend's cat


Breaking News


The Kansas City Star


Updated: 2014-01-31T18:29:29Z




The Associated Press


— A Junction City man was sentenced to one year of probation for killing his girlfriend's cat by stuffing cigarettes and cotton swabs down its throat.



Read more Breaking News


KMAN reports William Lemieux Jr., who had pleaded no contest to animal cruelty in November, was sentenced Friday in Geary County District Court.


Lemieux also was ordered to pay costs and not to contact his girlfriend. He also is not allowed to have pets and must follow all recommendations from a domestic violence assessment and a drug and alcohol evaluation.


Lemieux's girlfriend found her cat dead in a bag in a trash can near her home. Assistant County Attorney Michelle Brown said a veterinarian later found three cigarettes and a cotton swab jammed in the cat's throat.










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Arthur Bryant's closes in the Ameristar casino


Cityscape


The Kansas City Star


Updated: 2014-01-31T18:05:53Z



By JOYCE SMITH


The Kansas City Star


Arthur Bryant’s Barbeque has closed in the Ameristar Casino Hotel Kansas City.




Read more Cityscape


“We were there 16 or 17 years. But we couldn’t work out a new deal with them,” said Gary Berbiglia, co-owner of Arthur Bryant’s. “We didn’t want to leave.”


Roxann Kincaid, spokeswoman for Ameristar, said the restaurant closed earlier this month.


“We enjoyed a very long relationship with Arthur Bryant’s,” Kincaid said. “We are looking for fresh ideas, new food and beverage options.”


Ameristar also offers barbecue at its Horizons Buffet.




To reach Joyce Smith, call 816-234-4692 or send email to jsmith@kcstar.com. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter at JoyceKC










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Super Bowl Bingo game by Olathe family appears on national TV


News


The Kansas City Star


Updated: 2014-01-31T17:43:53Z



By ROBERT A. CRONKLETON


The Kansas City Star


A bingo-themed game created for the Super Bowl by an Olathe family got a little national attention Friday.



A bingo-themed game created for the Super Bowl by an Olathe family got a little national attention Friday. Aaron and Sarah Holmes created the game to help keep their non-sports fans interested in the Super Bowl.


Read more News


The Live with Kelly & Michael television talk show highlighted the game during the show’s segment on Football Frenzy.


“We have a group of close friends that we get together ever Sunday night and every Super Bowl to play different games,” said Aaron Holmes, who created the game with his wife, Sarah.


The game is a little different from your typical bingo game in which each box has two options. Players select one option before the game and the predictions set the bingo card.


For example, a player would select which team calls the first time out or which sideline reporter would be shown first — Pam Oliver or Erin Andrews?


“Bingo isn’t a revolutionary idea,” Aaron Holmes said. But it’s a game that people know how to play so it’s a way to keep non-sports fans interested in the football game.


The talk show discovered the game when the Holmes put it up on Sarah Holmes’ Houseofboys5 Etsy site.


The show was looking for different ideas and recipes to help people celebrate the Super Bowl.


The game is selling for $5 on Etsy, which allows people to download it and make copies for their parties.


“I usually make up all kinds of different games and gift cards,” Aaron Holmes said. “If I didn’t bring one to the Super Bowl, people would be disappointed.”




To reach Robert A. Cronkleton, call 816-234-4261 or send email to bcronkleton@kcstar.com.










The Kansas City Star is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.


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Stomach bug sweeps through second grade in De Soto district school


Breaking News


Updated: 2014-01-31T17:37:53Z






About 25 second-graders at Riverview Elementary School in the De Soto School District stayed home Friday while the school managed Day Two in an outbreak of the stomach bug.



Read more Breaking News


The school determined the culprit was a norovirus — a common, highly contagious “bug” that can inflame the stomach and intestines, causing pain, nausea and throwing up.


The absences affected about one out of every four of the 98 second-graders in the school.


To help prevent further spreading of the virus, the school had the second-graders eat in their classrooms, and the school postponed after-school programs Thursday so that its maintenance team could conduct a thoroughly disinfecting cleaning, said district spokesman Alvie Cater. The school remained in session both days.


The school will undergo another round of thorough cleaning this weekend, just to make sure. Meanwhile, teachers and staff are reemphasizing the importance of proper and frequent hand-washing with students and parents, Cater said.




Joe Robertson, jrobertson@kcstar.com









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Goodwill workers find $43,000 in pockets of donated clothing


Breaking News


The Kansas City Star


Updated: 2014-01-31T14:09:11Z




The Associated Press


— Workers going through donated clothing at a Michigan thrift store turned up more than $43,000 in the pockets of suits and a robe.



Read more Breaking News


Goodwill manager Tyler Gedelian tells the Monroe Evening News that he sometimes finds loose change clothing, but nothing like what happened Wednesday at the Monroe store.


Stuffed in envelopes in the pockets were tidy stacks of $100 bills.


The 29-year-old called police, who tracked down the man who donated the clothes. The newspaper reports that person was cleaning out an elderly relative's closet and took the clothes to Goodwill; he didn't know there might be money hidden in them.


Gedelian says his biggest concern was finding the rightful owner.










The Kansas City Star is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.


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"NFL Today' Host James Brown -- George Zimmerman Would Run From These Fists


EXCLUSIVE


013114_james_brown_launch

"NFL Today" host James Brown says George Zimmerman would never agree to fight him ... insinuating Zimmerman would be too scared.


We got James last night in NYC ... and asked him if he'd be willing to fight GZ ... who's offered to take on any opponent -- black or otherwise -- in a celebrity boxing match.


Listen to James ... he sounds pretty confident.






Actress and lapdancers cleared of kidnapping nightclub boss over £42,000 Cheltenham Festival debt



  • Charlotte Devaney and three lapdancers denied charge of kidnapping

  • Devaney recruited 60 lapdancers to work for Curtis Woodman in 2012

  • Mr Woodman's pop-up nightclub was closed because dancers stripped off

  • He refused to pay Devaney and lapdancers more than £42,000

  • He told Bristol Crown Court he was kidnapped six months later

  • Devaney and lapdancers have now been cleared of kidnapping


By James Rush


|


Three lapdancers and an actress have been cleared of kidnapping a club boss who failed to pay them £42,000 in wages.


Charlotte Devaney, 34, a DJ and producer who starred alongside comedian and actor Simon Pegg in comedy How To Lose Friends and Alienate People, recruited 60 lapdancers to work for Curtis Woodman, 34, at his pop-up nightclub during the famous Cheltenham Festival in March 2012.


Authorities closed the Embassy Club in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, on its third night because the dancers stripped off - despite rules ordering them to wear nipple tassels and bikinis.


Actress Charlotte Devaney (second from left) and lapdancers Mandy Cool (left), Rachel Goodchild (second from right) and Stephanie Pye (right) have been cleared of kidnapping a club boss who failed to pay them £42,000 in wages

Actress Charlotte Devaney (second from left) and lapdancers Mandy Cool (left), Rachel Goodchild (second from right) and Stephanie Pye (right) have been cleared of kidnapping a club boss who failed to pay them £42,000 in wages



Mr Woodman refused to pay Devaney and the lapdancers more than £42,000 they had earned during the club’s first two nights.


He told Bristol Crown Court that six months later, on September 3 2012, Devaney, three dancers and two brothers, who had been hired as 'heavies', arrived at his work premises in Tewkesbury.


The local businessman claimed he was bundled into a BMW, beaten up and forced to transfer £4,800 into Devaney’s bank account during a 'terrifying' two-hour ordeal.


Devaney and lapdancers Mandy Cool, 29, Stephanie Pye, 31 and Rachel Goodchild, 24, denied a charge of kidnapping Mr Woodman.


Brothers Alex Morris, 23, and Robert Morris, 27, denied the same charge, along with two counts of robbery - relating to £60 cash and Mr Woodman’s £4,650 Breitling Skyland Avenger watch.


A jury of seven men and five women cleared the women following a three-and-a-half-week trial. Alex Morris was convicted of the two robbery charges, while Robert Morris was cleared of both.


Judge Geoffrey Mercer QC thanked the jurors, who reached unanimous verdicts, for their service in the case.



Charlotte Devaney (pictured) and three lapdancers have been cleared of kidnapping a club boss who failed to pay them £42,000 in wages


Stephanie Pye has also been cleared of kidnapping Mr Woodman following a three-and-a-half week trial


Charlotte Devaney (left) and Stephanie Pye (right), both pictured outside Bristol Crown Court today, have been cleared of kidnapping Curtis Woodman




Rachel Goodchild had also denied a charge of kidnapping Mr Woodman and was cleared today


Mandy Cool, pictured leaving Bristol Crown Court today, has been cleared of kidnapping Mr Woodman


Rachel Goodchild (left) and Mandy Cool (right) had also denied a charge of kidnapping Mr Woodman and were cleared today



The judge said: 'In any event, we understand that jury service causes you great inconvenience and disturbance to your lives.


'Without members of the public such as yourselves giving up your time for jury service, our system of justice cannot operate.'


Mr Woodman told the jury that he was 'surrounded' by the women - dressed in miniskirts, Daisy Duke shorts and stilettos - and feared for his life during the 'terrifying' incident.


He said £42,000 of the disputed money related to one customer, named only as 'Steve' in court, who spent six hours with lapdancers at the club.


Steve, who had won £50,000 at the races that day, spent £700 on drinks and racked up the bill drinking and singing Rod Stewart songs with the lapdancers.


But the following morning, he contacted his credit card company to say the bill was fraudulent and an investigation was launched - freezing the money for 120 days.




Robert Morris has also been cleared after he denied the same charge along with two counts of robbery


Alex Morris has been convicted of two robbery charges


Robert Morris has also been cleared after he denied kidnap along with two counts of robbery. His brother Alex Morris (right) has been convicted of two robbery charges




Police later decided the money had been legitimately spent and it was transferred to Mr Woodman, who failed to pass it on to the women who had earned it.


He told the court this was because they had breached contracts agreeing to wear nipple tassels and bikinis, leading to the club being closed on its third night.


'If you have ever asked a stripper to keep her clothes on when she is working, it doesn’t happen,' Mr Woodman, who gave evidence behind a screen, told the jury.


'I was constantly bombarding them - "Put your clothes on, we are going to get shut down".'


Devaney said 19 girls were left unpaid after the closure and constantly phoned her to find out where their earnings were.



Curtis Woodman claimed he was bundled into a BMW, beaten up and forced to transfer £4,800 into Devaney's bank account during a 'terrifying' two-hour ordeal


After the hearing Miss Devaney (pictured in 2009) said: 'It is the right verdict. We are now looking forward to getting on with our lives now'


Curtis Woodman (left) claimed he was bundled into a BMW, beaten up and forced to transfer £4,800 into Devaney's bank account during a 'terrifying' two-hour ordeal. After the hearing Miss Devaney (pictured, right, in 2009) said: 'It is the right verdict. We are now looking forward to getting on with our lives now'



She spent months chasing Mr Woodman for payment before driving to confront him with the three dancers and the Morris brothers.


'I was in fear of my life. I didn’t have a clue what was going on,' Mr Woodman claimed.


He insisted the group drove him around Cheltenham for two hours in Devaney’s BMW 1 Series before dumping him on a residential street.


The jury heard that professional martial arts fighter Robert Morris kicked and punched Mr Woodman up to 12 times in the face, while his brother Alex threatened him with a knife.


Mr Woodman said Alex Morris robbed him of £60, his £4,650 'pride and joy' Breitling watch and he was forced to phone his bank to transfer £4,800 to Devaney.


Charlotte Devaney with Simon Pegg in How To Lose Friends And Alienate People

Charlotte Devaney with Simon Pegg in How To Lose Friends And Alienate People



Devaney said 19 girls were left unpaid after the closure and constantly phoned her to find out where their earnings were

Devaney said 19 girls were left unpaid after the closure and constantly phoned her to find out where their earnings were



A custody officer discovered the watch, which has a 1.7in (44mm) face, on the person of Alex Morris two days after his arrest.


Devaney told the jury that Mr Woodman had concocted the kidnap story to avoid paying his debts.


She said: 'He invented all of this so he didn’t have to pay us the money back.


'You don’t make girls take their clothes off and then not pay them to work. It is not a moral thing to do.'


Alex Morris, from Southampton, admitted carrying a bladed article, namely a Stanley knife, on the day of the incident.


He, along with his brother Robert, also from Southampton, had denied charges of robbery relating to £60 and the Breitling watch.


Devaney spent months chasing Mr Woodman for payment before driving to confront him with the three dancers and the Morris brothers

Devaney spent months chasing Mr Woodman for payment before driving to confront him with the three dancers and the Morris brothers



Devaney, from London, Pye, from Sutton Coldfield, Cool, of Southampton, and Goodchild, also of Southampton, had each denied a charge of kidnap on September 3 2012.


Alex Morris will be sentenced at Bristol Crown Court on February 10.


Miss Devaney, Miss Goodchild, Miss Cool, Miss Pye and Robert Morris screamed, hugged and loudly wept as the verdicts were returned.


Alex Morris did not attend court to hear the verdicts.


The Morris brothers were both cleared of the kidnap charge.


Devaney told the jury that Mr Woodman had concocted the kidnap story to avoid paying his debts

Devaney told the jury that Mr Woodman had concocted the kidnap story to avoid paying his debts



Speaking outside court on behalf of the women, Miss Devaney said: 'It is the right verdict. We are now looking forward to getting on with our lives now.'


Civil proceedings against Mr Woodman for the £42,000 are ongoing.


Robert Morris wore a T-shirt stating 'Will Smith For President' in reference to Mr Woodman's comments that he looked like the actor.


'I'm ecstatic' he said. 'The last time I cried was when I was 15 years old. I had to fight for my liberty in that courtroom for weeks - it just wasn't right. I hope Curtis Woodman gets his day in court.'